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Published On: Tue, Jan 13th, 2009

Who would win in a battle, Breakdancing vs. Capoeira?

Saludos..

I was watching Beat Street the other day and re-living moments of my life when break dancing, graffiti and hip hop ruled. There is a scene from Beat Street that is labeled on YouTube as "the subway battle" when two rival b-boy crews do Battle in a NYC subway station. It was actually a very realistic glimpse of what life was like in the 80's. One thing that was interesting was that although most of these battles were non violent, police persecuted public dancing as a crime.

It seems that history may have had a precedent for that…

Did you know that Capoeira was outlawed and punishable by death before the abolition of Slavery?

Watch the two videos below, do you see any similarities in the dynamics of Break dancing vs. Capoeira? Leave a comment with your thoughts…

As I am,

George Torres
The Urban Jibaro

PS… shout out to my boys from Rock Steady Crew (both those keeping Hip Hop alive and those no longer with us) especially Buck 4, Flex and Chica (Crotona and 187th)…I will never forget your chapter in my hip hop experience.

 

Beat Street Subway Battle

 

Breakdance – (breaking, b-boying or b-girling) is a street dance style that evolved as part of the hip hop movement among African American and Puerto Rican youths in Manhattan and the South Bronx of New York City during the early 1970s. It is normally danced to pop, funk or hip hop music, often remixed to prolong the breaks, and is a well-known hip hop dance style. A break dancer, breaker, b-boy or b-girl refers to a person who practices break dancing. Break dancing may have begun as a constructive youth culture alternative to the violence of urban street gangs.[1] Today, break dancing culture is a remarkable discipline somewhere between those of dancers and athletes. Since acceptance and involvement centers on dance skills, break dancing culture is often free of the common race, gender and age boundaries of a subculture and has been accepted worldwide. 

Source: wikipedia

Capoeira Documentary

 

Capoeira (IPA: [ka.pu.ˈej.ɾɐ], etymology disputed) is a blend of martial arts, games, and dance originated in Brazil from the regions known as Bahia, Pernambuco, Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais, and São Paulo, being created and developed by slaves brought from Africa. Its art form originated in Brazil during the 16th century. Participants form a roda (circle) and take turns playing instruments, singing, and sparring in pairs in the center of the circle. The game is marked by fluid acrobatic play, feints, and extensive use of groundwork, as well as sweeps, kicks, and headbutts. Less-frequently used techniques include elbow-strikes, slaps, punches, and body throws.

Source: wikipedia

Who would win in a battle, Breakdancing vs. Capoeira?